I recently viewed a documentary about the great migration accomplished each year by monarch butterflies. I was aware that monarch butterflies migrated. What I didn’t know was that only a specific generation makes the trip from Canada to Mexico. This special generation actually lives longer and flies farther than their parents and grandparents. This got me thinking, that’s somewhat similar to the generation of millennials and what they are experiencing regarding technology.

The definition of a millennial can vary somewhat but it is generally accepted to include those born between the years of 1982-2000. While millennials were being born and growing up, technology was advancing at a rapid pace. In a sense, a great migration began to occur. In almost no time, technologies that were unknown a few years before became absolute necessities at work and at home. And there’s no sign of it slowing down. While still relatively young, millennials have already experienced massive technological transitions. As a result, they possess very unique traits.

Millennials make up a significant part of the American workforce. More than 1 in 3 American workers is a millennial according to a 2015 study by the PEW Research Center. There is a good chance that you have millennials working for you and that your new hires will also fall into this category. But should that excite you?

Actually, it should! Adopting technologies early is essential for businesses today. If you’re not early, you’re late. Learning how to use and implement these technologies is a strength possessed by many millennials. They can pick up a new device or download an app and in minutes they know all the features, how to use them, and all the possible benefits. Because they are constantly connected to social media, they’re often the first to know about new and exciting developments in technology. Why not encourage the millennials in your employ to alert you to potentially useful technologies?

For the monarch butterfly, the generation that makes the great migration is actually completing the migration started by their grandparents and parents. And their migration is essential for future generations. Likewise, millennials were born into a unique position that means that they will experience more of this technological migration than the generations that came before them. But the migration does not belong exclusively to the millennial. It is affecting everyone. It is really a privilege and a responsibility to be a part of this unique migration. If you are a millennial, contemplate how your experiences have influenced your personal strengths. Then direct your attention to putting those strengths to the best use for you and those around you.

Before viewing the documentary, I had never really thought about what being of the millennial generation meant for me. While there are a lot of ways that I don’t feel I fit into the mold of a stereotypical Millennial, my view of technology is in keeping with my generation. That’s why it is exciting to work at BBB where new technology is not just accepted but celebrated. All of us here at BBB, like the monarch butterfly, are ready to catch the next vertical draft of technology and use it to propel our clients toward their goals.